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Senior Home Care Services in Waterloo, Kitchener, Cambridge519-208-2000

What are the Symptoms and Warning Signs of a Heart Attack? – Kitchener, Waterloo, Cambridge

You have probably seen a heart attack occurring in the movies, with the victim violently clutching at their chest followed by a dramatic fall to the ground. Often, the symptoms of a heart attack are much more subtle, and it is not always immediately apparent what is happening. There are certain signs to watch out for that may indicate a heart attack, and several risk factors that can increase the likelihood of heart problems. Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Disease There are certain risk factors that make an individual more prone to cardiovascular disease and suffering a heart attack. Some of these risk factors include: Age Obesity High cholesterol High blood pressure Type 2 diabetes Genetics Gender Poor lifestyle choices Age The age that increased risk becomes a factor for heart attacks differs for men and women. For men, the age a heart attack begins to become more likely is 45. For women, the age is 55. Obesity Obesity is a growing issue in the western world, and with it comes a greater risk for a variety of health problems, including cardiovascular disease. Carrying around extra weight forces the heart to work harder to deliver the required oxygen and nutrients to all the cells in the body. High Cholesterol High cholesterol is another risk factor for heart problems. The focus here is on the harmful type of cholesterol, or LDL cholesterol. High levels of Low-Density Lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol can cause plaque to build up on the artery walls, making blood flow more difficult. High Blood Pressure Hypertension, or high blood pressure, increases the risk of a heart attack by putting...

Know the Warning Signs of a Stroke – Kitchener, Waterloo, Cambridge

The risk of suffering a stroke becomes greater after reaching 65 years of age. While it is true that stroke can occur at any age, people over 65 experience about 75% of all strokes in Canada. Stroke is the leading cause of physical disability in seniors, and the second biggest cause of mental disability, after Alzheimer’s. Stroke is the third leading cause of death for seniors in Canada, right behind heart disease and cancer. Roughly 50,000 people a year suffer strokes across Canada. What is a Stroke? A stroke is the loss of brain function that occurs due to problematic activity in the brain’s blood vessels. There are two main types of stroke: Ischemic Hemorrhagic Ischemic Stroke An ischemic stroke is characterized by a blockage of a blood vessel in the brain. This is the most common type of stroke and is often caused by a blood clot in the brain. This interrupts the blood flow to the brain, and if not attended to quickly can cause serious damage, destroying brain cells. Hemorrhagic Stroke A hemorrhagic stroke, on the other hand, is when a blood vessel in the brain bursts or is leaking, causing blood to flow into the brain, inducing swelling and intense pressure. If this pressure is not relieved and the leak attended to promptly, then the result is severe tissue and cellular damage, or even death. A brain aneurism falls into the category of hemorrhagic stroke. Act F.A.S.T. An immediate reaction and response is absolutely crucial for a stroke. Both types of stroke can cause irreparable damage if not recognized and treated as soon as possible....

Diabetes Management for Seniors – Kitchener, Waterloo, Cambridge

Cases of people diagnosed with type 2 diabetes continue to climb across Canada, and particularly for people over the age of 65. In fact, about half of the people in Canada living with diabetes are 65 years of age or older. What is the difference between type 1 and type 2 diabetes? Type 1 and type 2 diabetes are both caused by the body’s inability to properly store and use glucose. Both types have the same underlying issue, but there are profound differences between the two. Type 1 Diabetes This type of diabetes typically appears in children or adolescents, but may occur in adults as well. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disorder that is heavily influenced by genetics, where the body produces insufficient levels of insulin. There is currently no method of prevention for type 1 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is much rarer that type 2 diabetes, making up only about 5% of diabetes cases in Canada. Type 2 Diabetes Type 2 diabetes is much more common, making up almost 95% of total cases. This type of diabetes tends to develop later in life and is characterized by the body’s inability to effectively process insulin. The prevalence of type 2 diabetes has increased dramatically over the past couple decades, and is associated with a sedentary, unhealthy lifestyle. What are the symptoms of type 2 diabetes? Type 2 diabetes can be effectively managed and treated if detected early enough. Some warning signs to be on the lookout for that may indicate type 2 diabetes, include: Increased thirst and hunger Frequent urination Dry mouth Fatigue Headaches Blurred vision Unexplainable weight...

Aging in Place – Kitchener, Waterloo, Cambridge

Research shows that about 90% of seniors wish to grow old in the comfort of their own homes. This is what is referred to as “aging in place”. With Canada’s increasingly aging population, this means that there are going to be millions of older adults that want to remain at home, rather than moving to a retirement home or assisted living community. It sounds like the most comfortable and satisfying solution, but is it practical or even possible? How can seniors make aging in place a reality? There are many challenges and concerns that come with aging in place. With age, naturally comes physical and mental decline. This inevitability throws a bit of a wrench into the mix. Physical and mental restrictions make some aspects of daily life impossible without some assistance. Therefore, it is important for seniors to have a plan in place to avoid future stress, confusion, and possible disaster. Three ingredients necessary for making aging in place a reality, are: Planning Assistance Support Planning Planning and preparing to remain at home is both essential and challenging. It is essential, because without the proper planning problems are bound to arise. Depending on the nature of the problem, it may threaten the entire living situation. Planning can also be quite challenging because it is difficult to predict future needs and health levels. The first step of effective planning is to assess the current situation. What is the current health status of the person in question? Are there existing health conditions? Does this person live alone? Getting an accurate read on the present, can help determine what may be...

Adult Day Care for Seniors – Kitchener, Waterloo, Cambridge

People are living longer these days and as we get older we tend to require various types of assistance to get through daily routines. Most older adults cherish their independence and are generally looking for ways to hold on to an acceptable level of autonomy. This typically requires some outside assistance. Family caregivers are often a big help to aging family members, but there is only so much time and effort one person can give. Adult day care is an ideal solution for both seniors needing assistance and caregivers that could use a break. What is Adult Day Care? Adult day care is usually held in a non-residential care facility and is open for seniors to attend to receive a variety of services and support. The idea is to provide a safe and secure place for seniors to feel comfortable with others in a similar situation. Types of Adult Day Care There are three basic types of adult day care for seniors to choose from, depending on the level of assistance they require and services they are looking for. Three different options to choose from for adult care, are: Social Day Care Medical Day Care Specialized Day Care Social Day Care This is a great option for seniors that are looking for a little increase in social interaction. Social adult day care centres often provide some stimulating activities for seniors to engage in. Seniors will also likely have access to a variety of health services that may be beneficial, as well as the opportunity to enjoy a nutritious meal with others. Medical Day Care This type of adult day...

UTIs in Seniors – Signs, Symptoms, and Treatment – Kitchener, Waterloo, Cambridge

What is a urinary tract infection (UTI)? A UTI is an infection in your urinary system – urethra, ureters, bladder, and kidneys. Most infections involve the lower urinary tract – the bladder and urethra. The classic symptoms of a urinary tract infection (UTI) are burning pain and frequent urination, but UTIs may not cause these classic symptoms in older adults. Instead, older adults may present with behavioural symptoms such as confusion. Although the reason for this connection is unknown, the connection between UTI and confusion has been well documented. What are the symptoms of a UTI? The classic symptoms of a UTI include: Painful urination Cloudy urine Frequent urination Urgent need to urinate Older adults may also present with different symptoms. Non-classic symptoms to look out for are: Sudden onset of confusion, or increase in confusion Increased irritability Incontinence Lethargy Falls Decreased mobility Pain in pelvic region It is important to be aware of these alternative symptoms, especially if you are caring for loved ones who have dementia or are unable to easily communicate. If the infection spreads to the kidneys you will see more severe symptoms such as: Fever Flushed skin Back pain Nausea Vomiting What are the risk factors for UTIs in older adults? Certain factors increase the risk of UTIs in older adults. Conditions such as dementia, Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, or diabetes are more likely to cause incontinence; if incontinence briefs aren’t changed regularly, an infection may occur. People with incontinence are more likely to hold in their urine which will increase the risk of infection. Catheter use may also increase risk. In women, the change of...
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