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Senior Home Care Services in Waterloo, Kitchener, Cambridge519-208-2000

Home Safety Tips in the Bathroom for Seniors – Kitchener, Waterloo, Cambridge

Home safety is extremely important for seniors that have chosen to age in place, to help improve comfort and security, while preventing falls and other accidents. The bathroom is one of the most hazardous rooms in the house for older adults, due to slippery surface areas, awkward movements in tight spaces, sharp objects, and pointy corners. A high number of seniors experience falls in the bathroom every year that result in serious injury and hospitalization. The majority of these falls happen due to slipping in the bathtub or shower, or when getting in or out of them. Many older adults also sustain bathroom injuries when standing up or sitting down to use the toilet. The average person uses the toilet 7 times a day, and that number tends to be higher for seniors, which makes the bathroom a critical area to secure for optimal home safety. Bathroom Safety Tips for Seniors There are several practical tips and suggestions that can be useful to help secure the washroom area and prevent injury. Some of the most beneficial tips, include: Reorganize Remove trip hazards Increase surface traction Install grab bars Install a transfer bench Use a shower chair Automatic lights Exercise caution Use a medical alert system Reorganize One of the major reasons injuries happen in the bathroom is excess clutter and poor organization. It helps to get rid of any unnecessary objects on floors and counter surfaces. Ensure all bathroom items and toiletries have a suitable place where they can be kept at all times. This helps prevent accidents with razors or other sharp objects left out on counter tops....

Handling the Transition to Long Term Care – Kitchener, Waterloo, Cambridge

  The decision to transition an aging loved one into long term care can be a difficult and involved decision. What is Long Term Care? Long term care is fairly complex term that can involve a variety of care scenarios. Basically described, long term care is a service that generally involves skilled nursing care for medical conditions, and 24 hour supervision for seniors that are no longer able to provide sufficient care for themselves. Options for long term care consist of moving to a nursing home or residential care facility, or arranging the services of a live-in caregiver. Eligibility for Long Term Care Subsidies in Ontario There are government subsidies available for some long term care residents in Ontario. Eligibility is based on a range of factors, including: Health status Type of long term care accommodation (only basic accommodation is covered) Income Applicant must already be receiving: Old age pension Ontario disability support Guaranteed income supplement You will have to fill out an application and provide a number of supporting documents to determine eligibility. Helping your Loved One Transition to Long Term Care The transition to a long term care facility is a big move for seniors and their families. Not only is the move itself stressful, but seniors are forced to say goodbye to the comfort of home. In many cases, the person moving has lived in this house or neighborhood for years, and possibly even their whole lives. Also, a lot of seniors see this move as a loss of independence. Offering positive reassurance and an optimistic attitude toward the move can be a big help. Some...

Challenges of Moving from House to Retirement Home – Kitchener, Waterloo, Cambridge

Moving is a stressful task for anyone, regardless of age. For people over 65 that may be struggling with mobility and health issues, the move can be overwhelming and even frightening. Your senior loved one will need all your support to make the move as painless as possible, with the least amount of strain on both health and finances. There are a variety of reasons and scenarios that can arise that result in the need for your senior loved one to move to a retirement home or assisted living community. A few possible reasons for the move may be health issues, home maintenance stress, the need to downsize, or other factors. Some of the difficulties that come with aging can have a negative impact on the ability to live independently. The move to a retirement home can help remove some of the burden and stress. Tips for Helping your Loved One Move to a Retirement Home Many seniors are not overly excited to leave their own home to move to a new retirement community amongst strangers. You can help them overcome these challenges with good planning and support. Some tips for a smooth transition, may include: Offer reassurance and support Contact family members Establish a plan Downsize Prepare for the move Offer Reassurance and Support Your loved one is likely going to need a lot of encouragement and unwavering optimism to get through this stressful and demanding event. Keeping the lines of communication open and honest is a good way to approach it. Seniors moving out of their homes are likely to have strong emotional ties to the place...

Should I Move to Another City to Care for my Aging Loved One? Kitchener, Waterloo, Cambridge

Providing distance care for an aging loved one can be challenging. Even just living an hour away can make it tough to offer the level of support you would like to. For family members that live in another province or several hours away, it can be a difficult decision as to what to do. You want to be able to help as much as you can, but you also have your own life and responsibilities to consider. In most cases, the solution for distance care is reversed. Having your elderly parent or relative move in with you. This move presents its own set of challenges. Many people don’t consider the option of moving closer to a loved one for additional support. Things to Consider Before Making a Move There are many factors to think about before moving houses to be closer to an ailing family member. It is a huge move to uproot your life for the benefit of another person. The decision may come down to the level of care that is needed, and the viable alternatives available. Some factors to consider, may include: What level and frequency of care is needed? What local support is available? What can be done in case of emergency? Is long term care required? How far is too far? What level and frequency of care is required? This may be the biggest factor in determining if a move is needed to support your aging loved one. A substantial component is whether or not they are able to continue to lead an independent lifestyle while remaining at home. The scenario can change significantly...

Preventing Pressure Sores for Seniors – Kitchener, Waterloo, Cambridge

Pressure sores, also known as bed sores or pressure ulcers, are often painful and can potentially lead to more serious health conditions. What are pressure sores? Pressure ulcers are typically caused by soft tissue, like skin, being pressed against a hard surface for an elongated period of time. Pressure sores are more prevalent in older adults with diminished strength and mobility. The need to sit or lie down for extended periods can often result in the onset of pressure ulcers. Pressure sores impede blood flow, and significantly reduce circulation in affected areas. How do pressure ulcers develop? Pressure ulcers are can occur on any part of the body, but the areas where the skin is thinner and closer to the bone are more susceptible. This includes elbows, ankles, heels, knees, shoulder blades, and base of the spine. Pressure sores tend to develop in stages, and get worse over time without proper treatment. Stages of Pressure Sore Development Untreated pressure ulcers are fairly easy to manage if attended to in the early stages. If left too long, serious health complications can arise, and the result can even be fatal. Pressure sores generally develop in the following stages: Red or rashy skin Appearance of sores or blisters Open sores and tissue damage Severe skin damage and infection Red or Rashy Skin When pressure sores first begin to develop, the affected area typically becomes red and may feel warm the touch. Skin may start to feel itchy and uncomfortable. Sores and Blisters The next stage is when visible sores or blisters begin to emerge. These blisters will likely be painful, and the...

Sharing Home Care Responsibilities and Resolving Conflict – Kitchener, Waterloo, Cambridge

Caring for an elderly family member takes commitment, dedication, and teamwork. When it comes to family caregivers, it is often the child or sibling in the closest geographical proximity that ends up shouldering most of the responsibility. This may work for a short period of time, but often ends in resentment and caregiver burnout. That is why it is important to share the load to prevent family conflict and hostility. Tips for Sharing Caregiver Duties There are many approaches and practices to home care that can be used to divide up the work and distribute it as evenly as possible amongst family members. Some things to try can include: Starting a discussion Making a list of tasks and responsibilities Consider each family member’s strengths Examine each person’s weaknesses Distance support Supporting the primary caregiver Respite care Starting a Discussion First things first, it is necessary to open the lines of communication and start a discussion. This can be done by arranging a meeting for all involved family members. If it is feasible to meet at a physical location, that is likely the most effective approach. If not, it can be done over the phone, through email, or online via Skype or a similar video meeting platform. Find out all family members that wish to be involved and initiate a dialogue. There is no point in forcing unwilling family members to participate, it will only cause more problems. Make Lists Once you have an idea of all family members wishing offer to assistance and support, the next step is figure out what needs to be done. Make a list of...
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