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Senior Home Care Services in Waterloo, Kitchener, Cambridge519-208-2000

Age Friendly Communities for Seniors – Kitchener, Waterloo, Cambridge

The general population in Canada, and around the globe, is aging at a rapid rate and it is estimated that by the year 2050 almost a quarter of the world’s population will be over 60 years old. This shift in population demographics has sparked the trend of creating age friendly communities for older adults. What does Age Friendly Community mean? An age friendly community is one that takes into account the growing needs of seniors, and accommodates those needs with effective services, features, and benefits. The goal is to assist seniors in the pursuit in living a healthy, active, and independent lifestyle, while aging in the comfort of home. The vast majority of older adults these days are choosing to age in place, and age friendly communities can help facilitate that ambition. The World Health Organization (WHO) began developing a Global Age Friendly Cities Project in 2006. This project was designed to assess the capacity for individual cities to provide the means for older adults to live a healthy and active lifestyle. What are the features of an Age Friendly Community? Some of the parameters that were examined to determine benefits and accessibility for seniors, include: Housing Transportation Outdoor spaces and buildings Social participation, support, and inclusion Employment and volunteer opportunities Communication and information access Health services Accessible Housing One of the most important aspects of creating an age friendly community is making affordable and accessible housing available for seniors. As previously mentioned, older adults are looking to remain in their own homes and communities they are familiar with while they age. In order to make this happen, existing...

Vaccinations for Seniors to Prepare for Cold and Flu Season – Kitchener, Waterloo, Cambridge

Cold and flu season is upon us once again, and both seniors and caregivers are susceptible to contracting a flu virus during this period of increased infection outbreak. Older adults are vulnerable to the flu due to declining immune function, as we get older the body is just not able to fight off illness and disease with same efficacy that it used to. Caregivers are also at a higher risk, as they tend to spend a lot of time with ailing seniors, and many caregivers also have compromised immunity from lack of quality sleep and chronic stress. Seniors should be especially diligent in taking the available precautions for flu prevention, as they are not only more prone to getting the flu, but also more likely to experience complications and more serious health issues as a result. There are many things that can be done to help reduce the risk of catching a flu bug, and education is a good start, to understand exactly how the virus works to make it more easily preventable. What are the different types of flu virus? The flu is characterized by an infection of the nose, throat, and lungs, and there are two main categories of viruses: Influenza A Influenza B There are actually 4 types of flu viruses, influenza A, B, C, and D. However, only types A & B are relevant to seasonal outbreaks. The main difference between type A and type B being that influenza B is found only in humans, while influenza A is found in a variety of species, making this type of the virus more diverse and difficult...

Home Safety Tips in the Bathroom for Seniors – Kitchener, Waterloo, Cambridge

Home safety is extremely important for seniors that have chosen to age in place, to help improve comfort and security, while preventing falls and other accidents. The bathroom is one of the most hazardous rooms in the house for older adults, due to slippery surface areas, awkward movements in tight spaces, sharp objects, and pointy corners. A high number of seniors experience falls in the bathroom every year that result in serious injury and hospitalization. The majority of these falls happen due to slipping in the bathtub or shower, or when getting in or out of them. Many older adults also sustain bathroom injuries when standing up or sitting down to use the toilet. The average person uses the toilet 7 times a day, and that number tends to be higher for seniors, which makes the bathroom a critical area to secure for optimal home safety. Bathroom Safety Tips for Seniors There are several practical tips and suggestions that can be useful to help secure the washroom area and prevent injury. Some of the most beneficial tips, include: Reorganize Remove trip hazards Increase surface traction Install grab bars Install a transfer bench Use a shower chair Automatic lights Exercise caution Use a medical alert system Reorganize One of the major reasons injuries happen in the bathroom is excess clutter and poor organization. It helps to get rid of any unnecessary objects on floors and counter surfaces. Ensure all bathroom items and toiletries have a suitable place where they can be kept at all times. This helps prevent accidents with razors or other sharp objects left out on counter tops....

Home Safety Tips in the Kitchen for Seniors – Kitchener, Waterloo, Cambridge

The kitchen is generally one of the most high traffic, busiest rooms in the house, and it can also be one of the most dangerous if not approached with care. There are many potential hazards in the kitchen that can result in injury or worse for seniors. Why does age play a role in kitchen safety? As physical strength and mobility diminish with age, so too do response and reaction time, which can be problematic in a room with so many appliances and sharp objects. Along with physical capabilities, cognitive function is typically on the decline as well, which can result in issues like forgetting to turn a burner off, or leaving something in the oven while it is still on. These two aspects of physical and mental decline lead directly to the two biggest causes of concern for older adults in the kitchen: Falls Fires Falls in the Kitchen The decrease in physical strength and mobility that comes with aging is one of the biggest factors for increased risk of falls. Strength and mobility are directly related to coordination and balance, and if your foundation is not stable, i.e. your legs, then it is much easier to topple over with minimal cause. Increased risk of falls can also arise from poor eyesight, side effects of medications, or clutter and slippery surfaces in the home. A disproportionate number of seniors are treated in the hospital every year due to falls in the home. Another unfortunate fact about falls for seniors, is that once it happens the first time it can affect quality of life and rattle the confidence, making...

Providing Support for Seniors while Promoting Independence – Kitchener, Waterloo, Cambridge

When providing support and assistance for seniors, whether you are a family member or a caregiver, it can be challenging to find the right balance between offering enough support and encouraging an independent lifestyle. Many older adults report retaining independence as a very important aspect of aging at home. Maintaining a home comes with responsibilities that can become more difficult to stay on top of as we get older. Offering the right of support can help provide the confidence and the ability to keep up with regular routines. The main goal is to help improve health and the quality of daily life. Doing things together is a great way to achieve a good balance, being there if you are needed but not being over-assertive. There can sometimes be a fine a line between doing things for your elderly loved one, and doing things with them. Yes, maybe you would get things done faster if you did it all yourself, but that is defeating the purpose of the exercise, which is promoting autonomy and as much self-sufficiency as possible. Everything tends to slow down a bit with age, including our minds and bodies. Strength and mobility begin to decline as well as cognitive abilities and memory. So, although it may take a little longer, it is recommended to encourage seniors to stay physically, socially, and mentally active. Interactive Caregiving Interactive caregiving offers a holistic approach to senior care, by encompassing physical, emotional, and mental health practices into interactive activities. Keeping seniors joyful and engaged helps reduce stress, anxiety, and depression, by improving overall moods and self-confidence. Home care assistance is...

Beating the Summer Heat and Avoiding Heat Stroke – Kitchener, Waterloo, Cambridge

Summer heat in southern Ontario is stretching into late September, and even early October in recent years, and is important for seniors to stay protected against the hazards of the harsh sun. Aside from the hot weather extending into what used to be the fall, the sun itself has also become a lot more unforgiving, and can cause significant skin damage in a very short time. Problems like heat stroke and heat exhaustion can be a real problem for seniors, as they are more susceptible to extreme heat and sudden temperature swings. There is also the concern of how existing medical conditions and medications can compromise the body’s ability to adjust to excessive heat. Health Concerns Caused by Extreme Heat There are several health conditions and ailments for seniors to be concerned about in the sweltering summer heat. Knowing the dangers of these conditions, as well as the symptoms and warning signs to look out for, can help prevent problems before they start. Some heat related conditions for seniors to be vigilant about, are: Dehydration Heat exhaustion Heat stroke Heat syncope Dehydration This is a fairly common problem for older adults in the summer, that is caused when the body loses more fluids than it is taking in. If your body is lacking sufficient water, and other essential fluids, it is no longer able to preform its required functions properly. If these fluids are not quickly replaced, dehydration is the likely result. Symptoms There are some warning signs that can help you recognize the onset of dehydration. Some symptoms to watch for, may include: Weakness Headache Dizziness Fatigue Muscle...
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