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Senior Home Care Services in Waterloo, Kitchener, Cambridge519-208-2000

Helping Seniors Avoid Social Isolation – Kitchener, Waterloo, Cambridge

Social isolation in seniors is much more common than people probably realize, or care to think about. As the senior population in Canada continues to climb, the incidence of solitude and seclusion for older adults is only going to increase. A lack of social activity in itself can be debilitating, and exacerbate feelings of loneliness. Social isolation can also lead to an array of other health issues, like anxiety, depression, cognitive decline, and poor physical condition. If you have an elderly parent, relative, or friend that you think may be drifting in the direction of reclusiveness, then it is recommended to seek assistance as soon as possible to correct the issue. Home caregivers can provide companionship and support, while focusing on improved overall health. Signs and Symptoms of Social Isolation It is a good idea to be aware and on the lookout for warning signs that your loved one may be heading for social seclusion. Some of the signs to keep an eye out for, might be: Neglecting housekeeping duties No attempt to keep up with personal hygiene Noticeable weight loss or gain, poor eating habits Changes in sleeping patterns Decline in cognitive abilities and mental sharpness Apathetic attitude Sedentary lifestyle Avoiding social events, no interest in social interaction Letting hobbies and usual activities go by the wayside All of these symptoms may indicate a more serious problem at hand. With the right support and assistance, these issues can be overcome to get back on track with a healthy lifestyle. Helping Seniors Conquer Social Isolation There are many approaches to assisting seniors on the path to solitude and depression....
Elder Orphans – Planning Ahead – Kitchener, Waterloo, Cambridge

Elder Orphans – Planning Ahead – Kitchener, Waterloo, Cambridge

It is more common for people to be single and childfree than ever before. Elder orphans – a term indicating baby boomers who are single and don’t have children (or are out of contact with them) – are a growing demographic. Without planning ahead, they can end up being vulnerable to being taken advantage of, and will be more likely to face medical problems and premature death. People who are aging alone need to make plans while they are independent and functional. Adult children typically help senior parents negotiate healthcare, social services, and housing; without this fallback, elder orphans can reduce their risks by creating their own support structures. Creating a community of friends and neighbours Whether you are part of a church, community group, or social network, it’s important to create a community of friends and acquaintances. Many people fear being isolated and disconnected, so it’s important to take steps and create a social routine. Angie is in her late 50s and has lived in the same city for almost a decade. She’s part of a knitting group, and meets each week for tea with her close friends. An only child, divorced, and childfree, she knows that she’ll have to rely on her surrogate family to help her if there are challenges as she ages. “After my father passed away there was no paperwork and it was such a struggle. I knew that I needed to get my legal paperwork in order.” Making legal decisions Elder law lawyers are able to draw up documents to protect you if you become incapacitated. Typically, people will turn to a friend,...
3 Tips to Help Include Loved Ones with Dementia in Family Gatherings – Kitchener, Waterloo, Cambridge

3 Tips to Help Include Loved Ones with Dementia in Family Gatherings – Kitchener, Waterloo, Cambridge

We want to include our loved ones in family gatherings for as long as possible. Those with dementia still enjoy being social, and the joy of being at the event will hold on even after the visit is forgotten. Dementia can change the behaviour and personality of the person suffering with it, but there are ways we can continue to include them. Here are three recommended tips on how to include your loved ones with dementia: Let your family know how to act As a caregiver, you can help your family members understand how to interact with your loved one. Many family members worry and don’t know how to talk to a person with dementia. Here are some things you can let your family know in advance:         Don’t be upset if the loved one doesn’t know who you are. Introduce yourself by your name and your relationship with them.         Don’t argue or correct them – if your loved one thinks you’re their sister, just go with it.         Your loved one may repeat themselves, and that’s okay. Don’t say “I just told you”, or “don’t you remember”. That can confuse them and make them upset.         If you become uncomfortable talking to them it’s okay to excuse yourself and walk away. You can stay close to your loved one and help facilitate conversations with family members. Your loved one may become confused or agitated with people coming and going; remaining by their side will allow them to have a constant, reassuring presence. Scheduling is important We want to schedule our gathering at a time of day that is best for your...
Aging Without Children – Kitchener, Waterloo, Cambridge

Aging Without Children – Kitchener, Waterloo, Cambridge

In today’s society many people have a great fear of aging for a variety of reasons. Two of the greatest concerns tend to be about health and maintaining independence. This can be an even bigger worry for seniors that don’t have any children to help them out when they need it. There tends be enough anxiety surrounding aging in the first place, seniors don’t need the added stress of wondering who will help take care of them. For aging adults without children or a living spouse, an alternative solution is required for peace of mind and continuing to live a comfortable life. Or perhaps there is a spouse present, but a spouse that has health issues that also needs attention. The situation can be complicated even further if cognitive abilities are declining and the onset of dementia may be looming in the future. With the average life expectancy on the rise in Canada, seniors may live another 20 to 30 years after retirement. It can be a great source of worry and uncertainty. Even though numbers of single seniors without children are steadily increasing, there are no social or governmental programs in place to offer assistance to these individuals. Even for older adults that have children, there is no guarantee that those children will be around to help when the time comes. Perhaps geographical distance or past conflicts may get in the way. So, what is the answer for aging adults without children to count on for support? One practical and effective solution to this dilemma is home care services. Especially for seniors that wish to continue to live...

Keeping Seniors Safe and Warm – Kitchener, Waterloo, Cambridge

When the cold-weather hits, there are new things to think about to help keep seniors safe, healthy, and happy in their homes. As we all know well, the winters here in Canada can bring about incredibly cold days and nights, and it can be tough to keep warm sometimes. Seniors might experience the cold in an even more severe way because of the age of their bodies and the circumstances that come with the current stage of their lives.  Helping seniors to think through the practices, strategies, tools, and reminders that they need to help keep themselves amply warm and cozy through the winter can help put everyone at ease and allow for a calmer, more comfortable few months.  Keeping Warm and Happy Keeping the body warm and the mind happy involves targeting practices and introducing healthy behaviours and habits into various aspects of life. The following are some basic things to consider to keep safe and warm: Dress Appropriately: While the notion of dressing in warmer clothes when the weather is colder is pretty intuitive, the actual practice of picking the clothes that are truly going to keep the body warm in all the right places can require a little thought or planning. Seniors should make sure that they stock their wardrobes at the beginning of the season with thermal under-layers, thick socks, warm fabrics, and proper outerwear. Layering can be incredibly important when the weather is cold, so having all the right things available to throw together into a cozy outfit is important. The extremities also tend to get cold even when the core is warm and...

Ways Seniors Can Feel More Energetic – Kitchener, Waterloo, Cambridge

Many seniors find themselves experiencing differences in their energy levels as they grow older. As we grow older, the many changes that our bodies and lives are going through can result in differences in how our bodies feel and function. For many seniors, it is difficult to navigate the changes that come to impact their energy levels. It can be discouraging to have your body seem to force you to slow down when you are still so ready and willing to get out and do things every day. While outside factors can never entirely override the need for rest and relaxation that the body requires to maintain a state of health and wellbeing, it is possible to make a few lifestyle choices that can help to allow seniors to feel more energetic so that they can continue to participate in all the things they love.  Boosting Energy Everyone’s body works differently, and the things that work well for one person will likely be a little bit different than the ones that work for someone else. Generally speaking, the following are some great things to try that can help seniors to feel more energetic and less sluggish and fatigued throughout the day: Sleep Well: Many seniors deal with sleep problems, and it can be hard to have energy during the day when it hasn’t been replenished throughout the night. Having a good nighttime routine and setting things up in a way that is more conducive to a good night’s sleep can make all the difference. Routine and environment are one thing, but if sleep is a persistent problem it can...
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