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Senior Home Care Services in Waterloo, Kitchener, Cambridge519-208-2000

Age Friendly Communities for Seniors – Kitchener, Waterloo, Cambridge

The general population in Canada, and around the globe, is aging at a rapid rate and it is estimated that by the year 2050 almost a quarter of the world’s population will be over 60 years old. This shift in population demographics has sparked the trend of creating age friendly communities for older adults. What does Age Friendly Community mean? An age friendly community is one that takes into account the growing needs of seniors, and accommodates those needs with effective services, features, and benefits. The goal is to assist seniors in the pursuit in living a healthy, active, and independent lifestyle, while aging in the comfort of home. The vast majority of older adults these days are choosing to age in place, and age friendly communities can help facilitate that ambition. The World Health Organization (WHO) began developing a Global Age Friendly Cities Project in 2006. This project was designed to assess the capacity for individual cities to provide the means for older adults to live a healthy and active lifestyle. What are the features of an Age Friendly Community? Some of the parameters that were examined to determine benefits and accessibility for seniors, include: Housing Transportation Outdoor spaces and buildings Social participation, support, and inclusion Employment and volunteer opportunities Communication and information access Health services Accessible Housing One of the most important aspects of creating an age friendly community is making affordable and accessible housing available for seniors. As previously mentioned, older adults are looking to remain in their own homes and communities they are familiar with while they age. In order to make this happen, existing...

What to Expect When Recovering from Hip Replacement Surgery – Kitchener, Waterloo, Cambridge

It is no secret that hip problems are a major concern for older adults. In a lot of cases people do anything they can to avoid surgery, as the thought of going under the knife is terrifying to many. Most people wait until the pain and stiffness become unbearable before opting to go the surgery route. The truth is, the sooner you bite the bullet and decide to have hip surgery, the easier the road to recovery will be. In fact, many seniors report immediate relief and improved mobility just days after the surgery takes place. Hundreds of thousands of people across North America have surgery every year and report successful recovery, improved mobility, and better quality of daily life. What can you expect after hip surgery? First of all, you should definitely expect to experience some pain following your hip procedure. After all, it does involve taking actual bones out of your body and replacing them with a metal and plastic hip joint. The body is bound to experience some level of trauma after a procedure like that. It is reported that the first 3 days following surgery are typically the toughest, and you will likely require some dedicated assistance. Even simple things like getting in and out of bed or getting to the bathroom will be a struggle. Many people that have experienced this surgery report the third day after is one of the most painful, as surgery medications have completely worn off, and heavy inflammation sets in. Professional home caregivers can be of huge assistance during the is time. When does the recovery process start? Immediately....

It’s Never Too Late to Make New Friends – Kitchener, Waterloo, Cambridge

It seems the older we get, the harder it is to make new friends. I guess that is not overly surprising, since as a kid we are around new people all the time at school and through other family activities. As time goes on, connections become fewer and fewer as people get involved in careers and starting families, and social circles start to shrink. Then, all of a sudden after retirement you have all this time on your hands, but making new friends at that age can be a daunting prospect. But, it doesn’t have to be. There are many options and opportunities for older adults to take advantage of, to get social and meet new people. Making New Friends as a Senior Social activity is a very important aspect to maintaining a good level of overall health, and that is true at any age. Keeping up with old social ties tends to be a bit of a struggle as we get older, but is easier than ever to look up old friends and re-establish a connection. There are also plenty of social activities that can be joined to make some new acquaintances. Some useful tips for making new friends as an older adult, may include: Look up old friends Put yourself out there There are others in the same position Extend and accept invitations Take a class Exercise Volunteer Follow your interests Look up Old Friends Social media has made it easier than ever to find just about anybody you have ever met in your life. It can be fun to meet up with old friends you haven’t...

4 Tips to Help You Manage Long Distance Caregiving – Kitchener, Waterloo, Cambridge

If you live an hour or more away from your loved one, you are a long-distance caregiver. It is estimated that 10-15% of caregivers are travelling an hour or more to take care of a loved one! Even though you are travelling further you are providing the same level of support as those who live close by. Caregivers take on many significant roles: scheduling appointments, providing emotional support, helping with medications, managing finances, providing meals, and keeping their home clean and safe. This can be particularly challenging when these tasks have to be managed remotely. 1. Prioritize tasks. We cannot emphasize enough the benefits to creating organization and having lists! Anxiety and stress can be high when we’re helping a loved one deal with health challenges and having a list of priorities will be able to help you know how to best direct your time. If you’re feeling frustrated and are struggling to prioritize here is an exercise that may be helpful for you. Make a list of everything that you can think of that you need to do regarding caring for your loved one – appointments, housekeeping tasks, personal care, meal prepping, etc. Go through the list and give it a number between 1 and 5 (1 being of the highest priority, 5 being of the least priority) Rewrite your list, dividing the tasks into levels of priority Now you’ll have a good idea as to what MUST be done vs what would be NICE to get done. Manage your expectations and decide what you can realistically achieve. Sometimes good enough really is good enough. Bring in support....

UTIs in Seniors – Signs, Symptoms, and Treatment – Kitchener, Waterloo, Cambridge

What is a urinary tract infection (UTI)? A UTI is an infection in your urinary system – urethra, ureters, bladder, and kidneys. Most infections involve the lower urinary tract – the bladder and urethra. The classic symptoms of a urinary tract infection (UTI) are burning pain and frequent urination, but UTIs may not cause these classic symptoms in older adults. Instead, older adults may present with behavioural symptoms such as confusion. Although the reason for this connection is unknown, the connection between UTI and confusion has been well documented. What are the symptoms of a UTI? The classic symptoms of a UTI include: Painful urination Cloudy urine Frequent urination Urgent need to urinate Older adults may also present with different symptoms. Non-classic symptoms to look out for are: Sudden onset of confusion, or increase in confusion Increased irritability Incontinence Lethargy Falls Decreased mobility Pain in pelvic region It is important to be aware of these alternative symptoms, especially if you are caring for loved ones who have dementia or are unable to easily communicate. If the infection spreads to the kidneys you will see more severe symptoms such as: Fever Flushed skin Back pain Nausea Vomiting What are the risk factors for UTIs in older adults? Certain factors increase the risk of UTIs in older adults. Conditions such as dementia, Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, or diabetes are more likely to cause incontinence; if incontinence briefs aren’t changed regularly, an infection may occur. People with incontinence are more likely to hold in their urine which will increase the risk of infection. Catheter use may also increase risk. In women, the change of...

Nurse Case Management for Your Personalized Home Care Plan – Kitchener, Waterloo, Cambridge

Do you have an aging relative that wants to continue living at home but is struggling with daily routines and/or health issues? The continually expanding population of seniors in Canada suggests that chances are pretty good that you do. In fact, most people will end up providing some form of home care at some point in their lives for a senior family member. Family caregivers provide a tremendous amount of support for older family members already, but it can be difficult to shoulder the entire burden alone. Health status and home care assistance needs for seniors can change in the blink of an eye. All it takes is one injury or a sudden onset of an aliment, and your loved one’s need for assistance can increase dramatically. When this shift does occur, it puts extra pressure and stress on everyone involved. This problem can be solved with the assistance of a Nurse Case Manager at Retire-At-Home. Retire-At-Home KW Retire-At-Home is an esteemed home care agency that has been delivering personalized home care services to seniors and their families for almost 25 years. This wealth of experience has led to the development of an assortment of home care services that are tailored to the individual needs of older adults that want to keep living at home independently. Nurse Case Management Services Whatever your home care situation may be, a nurse case manager can help you figure out the best home care plan for you and your loved one. To get the ball rolling, a free consultation can be arranged with a registered Retire-At-Home nurse. During this initial assessment you will...
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